Mets Notes

I know the Willie Randolph thing has been done to death but something’s been bothering me ever since I read it. Bob Klapisch posted this on Tuesday regarding Willie:

This was in early May, long before Willie Randolph’s administration came crashing down. The manager summoned one of his veterans into his office for a closed-door meeting, challenging him to focus more on baseball.
It was a rare, line-in-the-sand moment for Randolph, who avoided confrontation with his players. But the manager’s attempt to assert his authority failed miserably, as the two men raised their voices at each other.
As he walked out the door, the elder Met taunted Randolph, “I’m going to be here longer than you.”

I am going to assume the veteran Met in question is Carlos Beltran. I don’t know Carlos personally, only from what I see through the TV camera. Maybe he is a firey person behind close doors, whatever.

What bothers me is that this event supposedly occurred in early May and it surfaces on June 17th. That is not to suggest that Mr. Klapisch is lying or just making stuff up (he’s no Alfano) rather I think this is that ugly part of out franchise that lurks in the front office. I would be willing to bet all the money in my pocket against all the money in Bob Kapisch’s pocket that this closed door story was either fabricated or leaked by Tony Bernazard or someone close to him.

This thing’s gotta happen every five years or so – ten years – helps to get rid of the bad blood.

I’ve never really understood how a baseball franchise could have such a disjointed front office. One organization trying to move in different directions is counterproductive. Why is there this eternal power struggle inside Shea Stadium that peaks with the infighting spilling into the public? Why do grown men, professional baseball men so called, act like high school girls? None of this backstabbing and agenda advancing can possibly help the team win anything.

Why this franchise can’t ever rid itself of these factions is beyond me. Something tells me Willie has to have a sense of relief to be done with this nonsense.

Anyway, on to actual baseball.

I had a look at the standings this morning after my local team, the Rangers took two of three from Atlanta. I was shocked to see:

PHI 42 32 –-
FLA 39 33 2.0
NYM 35 36 5.5
ATL 36 38 6.0
WSH 29 45 13.0

Did we just creep back into this thing? I mean, they’re not in striking distance but five and a half before the break isn’t insurmountable.

Wow, I just had a 2004 flashback

All forms of 2008 optimism have been met with utter frustration and disappointment. I’m setting myself up for further heartbreak by even writing this, but goddamn it, I refuse to give up on the Mets before the flipping All Star Break. This team can’t possibly be as bad as it’s played.

The Mets are headed to Colorado then at home for Seattle and the Yanks. A hot streak here and, hey who knows. Maybe second place?

That’s as far up as my hopes are willing to get.

Posted under Unsubstantiated Rumors

This post was written by Dan in Texas on June 20, 2008

Huh?

It was time for Willie to go; I am not attacking the dismissal. But at 3:15 AM after the first game of a series that they won?

This move needed to be made. This year’s poor start and bullpen woes may not be Willie’s fault. For Willie to yell and throw water coolers to fire up players isn’t in his personality and would come off as insincere and even grandstanding. At this stage, he isn’t the right man for the job anymore. Regardless of the cliché riddled quotes from players, “Willie Watch” was a distraction and his removal was necessary.

The way this was handled was completely unnecessary. Why he had to fly to Los Angeles to be canned defies reason. Why it was done at 3 AM is awkward. Why not just have Omar dismiss Willie on the diamond vision during the seventh inning stretch. Greg hit it right on the head; this brings back several old memories of a fractioned front office, multiple agendas, infighting and unstable team direction.

So adios, Willie! Sorry for the crappy send off. We’ve had some good times. You’ll catch on somewhere and I’m sure you’ll be a big league manager again!

Welcome to the hot seat Jerry Manuel! Closers who cant close, middle relief and set up men who cant hold leads, an offense that looks great on paper but goes cold for weeks at a time. Lack of focus, and poor execution run rampant. Have fun managing this mess!

Posted under Post Game

This post was written by Dan in Texas on June 17, 2008

The Driveler

If I were to become a superhero, I think I would be a superhero that fights baseball ignorance. My life wouldn’t change other than I would own a superhero costume. I would also try and bang that cheerleader chick from Heroes.

I would be the lamest superhero ever.

If I was a superhero, I my arch enemy would be Pete Alfano. He would be known as the Driveler. In my ongoing battle against baseball ignorance I sent an email to the Driveler. If you are a new reader to this site, Pete has made numerous erroneous claims starting with the first Driveler article I happened across in which Pete falsely stated the Mets are over the luxury tax threshold. Why he can’t do even the slightest bit of research is beyond me.

Last week Pete claimed Some baseball players wear batting helmets in the field as protection from objects being tossed from the stands.” As my duty to you, the baseball fan, I gave Pete his due public mockery:

What? Do you watch any baseball? Who wears a batting helmet in the field? First and third base coaches have to wear helmets now so they don’t get hit in the head with foul balls. John Olerud wore a batting helmet in the field but he retired in 2005, and again, to protect against baseballs. Pete would try and have us believe that fans throwing things at players is so rampant that “some players” are wearing them in the field. Either Pete is:
A. Lazy and assumes that his readers are too ignorant to know better.
B. A compulsive liar
C. Ignorant about Major League Baseball
D. A crazy man

Feel free to make stuff up though, Pete.

If Pete wanted to write this story he should have cited the firstbase umpire or the firstbase coach attacked by fans on separate occasions in Chicago or the obsessed Stefi Graf fan who attacked Monica Seles. Those fans were not representative of the average fan, but a better argument than just making something up. If you were going to write a story about unruly fans you shouldn’t have started it off writing about two lesbians kissing.

I felt that this was not a sufficient response to manufacturing blatantly false claims to support a bad argument. As a public service, I sent the following email to Pete Alfano of the Fort Worth Star Telegram:

[Note: Pete’s/The Driveler’s emails are in bold, my emails are in italics.]

Could I please see your list of players when you claimed that “Some baseball players wear batting helmets in the field as protection from objects being tossed from the stands.” I watch a lot of baseball and I haven’t seen one guy wear one. Yet I know it must be true that players are wearing batting helmets in the field. In fact, I know it is true because it was in the newspaper.

Do you even watch baseball?

I did not get a response for several days, until this morning:

Watched baseball for 40 years, the first game I ever covered Bob Moose no-hit the Mets in 1969 and you obviously don’t follow the sport very much. By the way, John Olerud comes to mind. He wore one playing first for the Mets, in fact. And players from time to time have worn them on the field when crowds have gotten a little too hostile.

Catchers wear them, but I don’t count them. Good luck with that blog and thanks for writing.

Pete Alfano

Of course, this was not where it ended, I could not, as the guardian of Baseball truth let this pass. I sent the following:

Olerud retired in 2005. Olerud wore the helmet because of a medical condition, not to protect himself from fans throwing things at him from the stands. John Olerud used to ride the subway to Shea so I really don’t think he was afraid of being attacked by any fans so that claim goes out the window. Remember you wrote: “Some baseball players wear batting helmets in the field as protection from objects being tossed from the stands.” So you are not the person in position to claim I don’t follow baseball very much. I watch every Mets game and other teams but don’t obviously watch every single game. If there is a player on the Royals, a team I don’t watch often for example, please name them. However, I am not the guy who made the claim.

Ok, you can have ANY player from ANY time who has worn a helmet for the express purpose of protection from fans throwing things despite that you used that made up fact to support you claim there is a new or recent trend in fan unruly behavior. Any examples of players?

See, when you write a blog, people are used to the author being accountable for any claims made.

Thanks for your response, I look forward to the list. Also, thanks for all the fun. You’re a good sport.

Dan

PS you also claimed the Mets were over the luxury tax threshold, which they are not.

And I received the following response:

Dan
I am from New York, attended the first Mets game at Shea (cut high school class) and went to the Polo Grounds on occasion during the 1962 and 63 seasons. I am an old Brooklyn Dodger fan who adopted the Mets and grew up not much caring for the Yankees. Worked in New York for many years with Newsday and New York Times. Was at UPI when I was assigned to cover the Mets on a saturday afternoon when Moose no-hit them. the mets had lost a twi0-night doubleheader the night before, but undeterred that year, they swept the Pirates in another doubleheader on Sunday.

Just feel it’s fair that you know my background. I don’t mind people taking issue with anything I write; I enjoy debate. I would have to research but I think Albert Bell might have worn a helmet once or twice in the outfield, and I know there was some nasty stuff going on at Yankee Stadium during the playoffs one year when fans were throwing batteries and a knife on the field. I think the Angels were in that series and their rightfielder may have donned a helmet.

Anyway, also understand that my Monday Morning Quarterback column is often written to poke fun at the sense and senibility of sports fans and sportswriters. I have always taken the business of writing and opinion seriously, buyt I like to find the fun in sports and sometimes, the absurdities. Sometimes, that New York wise guy rears its head.

Thanks for reading and feel free to keep bashing me.

Pete

So there you have it, folks. I think he is asking for mercy by claiming a Mets allegiance. I have not sent another email. But don’t breathe easy yet. I don’t think we’ve seen the last of…The Driveler!

Tune in next Monday, Same lame site, Same lame topic!

Posted under Pete Alfano

This post was written by Dan in Texas on June 10, 2008

Writer’s Block

I can’t bring myself to write about this weekend’s sweep. Instead, I will dedicate my efforts to the weekly hobby of mocking the world’s worst sports writer.

I really don’t know why I keep doing this but the man who claimed “Some baseball players wear batting helmets in the field as protection from objects being tossed from the stands” deserves public mockery. Pete did not issue a retraction nor did Pete respond to my email request for a list of players who wear batting helmets in the field for protection. This week’s Monday Morning Quarterback isn’t about baseball. It also doesn’t have any references to pop-culture events that happened 5 years ago, Madonna “jokes”, incorrect facts or Communist rants about how evil sports franchises make money. It does contain pretentiousness, steroid contempt, contempt for sports fans and faulty logic so I am going to ridicule this incompetent “sportswriter” yet again.

Will all apologies to Fire Joe Morgan, funnier and better than me, blah, blah, blah, we have:

The greatest athletes who lost this weekend

That is really the title; I’m not making that up.

By PETE ALFANO
STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER

I can’t believe he has the nerve to put his name on these pieces of garbage. I also like how he writes “STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER” after his name. It’s like he knows no one would believe he gets paid for writing these pointless articles.

The weekend that might have been in sports might have been disappointing but at least spared us the self-indulgent exercise of assigning an athlete — human or equine — a place in history.

Wow, that is an awkwardly written sentence. I don’t care how many words he had to look up in the dictionary, it is a clumsy contrivance. He used “might” twice in the same sentence. What an opening salvo. Doesn’t an athlete earn a place in history? If not, I would like to assign Shannen Doherty a place in baseball history because she’s hot. I heard she plays secondbase.

I love you Brenda

It’s what happens when you live in an ESPN “Instant Classic” world.

Oh, Pete, is this another pompous condescending assault on your readers or sports fans in general? Why bother? We all know the disdain and contempt you have for “John Q. Sportsfan.”

It seems as if no one can just sit back and enjoy an athletic achievement nowadays without trying to determine where it ranks. Even before Big Brown showed more horse sense than his handlers and decided during the race that given a cracked hoof, no steroids and a 90-degree day in New York, he’d rather not run in the Belmont Stakes, pundits were saying that the big 3-year-old colt was not in the class of Secretariat, Seattle Slew or Affirmed, all Triple Crown winners in the 1970s.

Shame on you pundits and fans alike who shall remain nameless and not because Pete made them up or anything, but because they are real.

I guess the “horse sense” thing was supposed to be a joke, whatever.

Well over 100,000 fans had come to Belmont Park hoping to see Big Brown become the first horse since Affirmed in 1978 to win the Triple Crown. Sports fans, and even non-fans, gathered expectantly around their TVs to watch as well, and yet, some people were already dissing the competition Big Brown had faced and speculating whether he was winning the Triple Crown by default.

Take that, “some people.” That’s what drives me nuts about Pete and his stupid column. He always makes reference to people he doesn’t identify. “Some people” is not accurately crediting your source or identifying your subject for the reader. It’s nothing.

Not to worry. You probably won’t hear Big Brown’s name mentioned among the legion of great thoroughbreds again.

I’ve got nothing…

Then, on Sunday, Roger Federer was in the final of the French Open with a chance to win his first Grand Slam event on clay and 13th Slam title, which probably would have cemented his status as the greatest player of all time.

This is one of Pete Alfano’s trademarks. His most annoying is making up facts. second is jamming two unrelated sporting events together to make a non-point while grasping at straws to prove the two are related. Which they’re not.

Hey, here’s a snobby lament about horse racing and now I am going to talk about tennis as if the two are even close to being similar sports except they happened on the same weekend. One is a man, the others a horse.

The problem is that Rafael Nadal, the clay court wunderkind from Spain, was on the other side of the net. And Federer turned in the type of big-event performance that we haven’t seen since, well, Saturday during the Belmont.

See, it’s like one never ending non-sequitur.

Nadal — an absolute dynamo on red clay — beat Federer for the third consecutive year in the French Open final. The score was 6-1, 6-3, 6-0, one of the worst final thrashings in more than 30 years. Federer didn’t quit, but he too was eased up.

“he too was eased up” doesn’t make any sense unless Pete is suggesting that Roger Federer made it to the French Open final with a jockey literally on his back, controlling his movement. I don’t watch tennis but if that’s the case, then that is impressive.

Nadal now has won the French Open four times in a row and did not lose a set in seven matches this year. It is probably fair to say that if someone — anyone — could have upset Nadal the past three years, Federer would have at least one French Open title.

It is also probably fair to say that if someone – anyone — can mash their fist on a keyboard, they can be employed as a staff writer by the Fort Worth Star Telegram.

Also, what are you talking about? If someone would have beat the guy who won, then Federer would be champ? Would it not seem likely that if there were someone better than Nadal- who beat you, that player would also beat you?

Thus, he might already have tied or surpassed Pete Sampras, who has the most Grand Slam titles, with 14.

What?

Comparing athletes from different generations is always tricky business because the playing field is constantly shifting. It used to be that track and field was a sport where you could measure the past and present because success is based on time and distance, but now you have to wonder how many records were steroid-aided.

Back to familiar ground, Pete bitching about steroids. Bring me the jaded, wacko nut job tirade, Petey boy.

And forgive the Monday Morning Quarterback for not being overwhelmed by baseball players reaching home run milestones because of the proliferation of performance-enhancing drugs in the sport for a generation.

Ah, that’s it.

Attention A-Rod, Griffey and Manny, though you’ve never been even slightly associated with PED’s other than you play baseball with other players who have used PED, Pete would like you to know, he’s NOT overwhelmed. Please forgive him.

Also, what does that have to do with tennis or horseracing?

In tennis, the consensus has been that Rod Laver deserves to be recognized as the greatest of all time because he won the Grand Slam twice and was the last to accomplish it almost 40 years ago. But the sport is much more competitive now than in Laver’s day. And, whereas three of the Slam events were played on grass back then, all four are on different surfaces now (grass, clay and two types of hard-court).

Throw in all the clay court specialists, and it seems unfair that tennis historians are a little reluctant to crown Sampras and Federer — both terrific athletes — as the best because they haven’t won the French.

So the title of this article should have been “Sampras and Federer: the co-best even though they haven’t won the French.”

I like how he shortens the French Open to just “the French” as if he’s a expert in the sport of Tennis. If you’ve ever read a Pete Alfano piece you will know that this is not the case as Pete doesn’t know anything about anything.

So, reaching the French Open final three times might not be quite good enough for Federer, who is approaching 27 and might have to hope some other clay court marvel can eliminate Nadal to clear an obstacle-free path to tennis immortality.

What? That sounds like Federer is planning a hit on Nadel. Again it is false logic to claim that if someone can beat Nadal, Federer would have a guarantee of defeating him. You would have to assume that said challenger would probably be pretty tough to beat. Repeating the same point doesn’t make it any less unsound. You are a crazy man.

No, it wasn’t quite the hyperbole-filled sports weekend we envisioned.

Pete does not know what the word hyperbole means.

Instead we are reminded of the late Jim McKay, and how he would have said that Big Brown and Roger Federer had gone from the “thrill of victory” to “the agony of defeat.”
palfano@star-telegram.com
Pete Alfano, 817-390-7985

The worst way to end a column, even this column: a tired, obvious quote that highlights absolutely nothing. Thanks for cheapening Jim McKay’s life, I hope his family isn’t reading the Fort Worth Star Telegram. I don’t think anyone is reading the Fort Worth Star Telegram.

Posted under FJM ripoff, Pete Alfano

This post was written by Dan in Texas on June 9, 2008

Pointless: Batting Helmets in the Field

With the Mets finally playing well, I probably should be spending more time enjoying my team’s recent success rather than lampooning a local sports writer and his god-awful, inept articles.

I should probably let this untalented author pass off his lazily written, ill-planned and barely thought-out crap as legitimate sports writing for my local newspaper.

I should probably do a lot of things. This week, Pete pens a well written and thought provoking piece on homosexual relationships and their impact on social norms, vis-à-vis acceptance in American culture, citing several noted sociologists and in-depth research. Just kidding, instead, with all apologies to Fire Joe Morgan, funnier and better than mine, blah, blah, blah, here is a vacuous piece of drivel entitled:

When is a kiss just a kiss, and a fan just a fan?

When Pete poses his title as a question, you know it’s going to be terrible.

Well, here’s a subject that ought to bring out the worst in everyone.

And I’m sure it’s a subject that brings out the worst literary ineptitude in the author. I swear to God, that’s his opening sentence. Can this guy write or what?

There was an incident at Safeco Field in Seattle last week in which a fuss was raised when a fan objected to two women kissing during a Mariners game. We have to assume this show of affection had nothing to do with baseball, given how solidly entrenched the Mariners are in last place in the American League West.

HYYYYY-OOOOHHHHHHHH! ZING!

Apparently

Man, this guy needs a new crutch word

the fan –and reportedly it was a woman attending the game with her son – took offense to this same-sex kiss and alerted an usher, who told the women to stop. Now, it gets really murky at this point because some eyewitness accounts say the kiss was a liplock worthy of Madonna and Britney Spears, while others say it was simply a peck on the lips or cheek.

Ah, the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards. I come for the shaky, feebly thought out premises but stay for the references to pop culture events that are five years or older.

Isn’t he burying the lede here? Are lesbians hanging out at baseball games?

Sirbrina Guerrero, one of the women involved, has filed a discrimination complaint over the incident. A spokesperson for the Mariners – a woman, by the way- says the club is looking into the matter. Guerrero, we should mention, has been a contestant on an MTV reality series.

I really hate people that speak of themselves as “we.” I wonder how many voices they have in their head. I also hate people that speak in the third person.

So, what does this have to do with sports?

Nothing, absolutely nothing.

Only in that it is another example of how ballparks and arenas have become communities unto themselves, where fans have become part of the game and much of what goes on in the real world doesn’t always apply.

First off, I have no idea what “much of what goes on in the real world doesn’t always apply” means. Are ballparks subject to a different set of federal laws like Indian reservations?

And another example of how ball parks have become communities where fans have become a part of the game? Did Ichiro get thrown out stealing third with two outs because the women were kissing? Did the kissing cause Jerrod Washburn to lose the strikezone? How were they part of the game?

Also: “Another example?” Where are the first examples?

Certainly, if heterosexual or gay couples are using a public setting to make out as if it were the back seat of a car, they are crossing the line and should be given a warning, then a room.

Great job stating the obvious. Keep in mind that this is IN THE NEWSPAPER. Also, since he is now referencing settings outside the ballpark I would like to point out that he wrote “much of what goes on in the real world doesn’t always apply.” a paragraph ago.

In fact, there is a provision at Safeco Field that says people showing “displays of affection not appropriate in a family setting” can be escorted out.

That is a poorly constructed sentence. Incidentally, I googled “women kissing Safeco Field” to check up on this story (because Pete sometimes just makes shit up) and every single article was shorter and better written than this one.

But Guerrero and her friend might have a case if they were just exchanging an innocent kiss. How many stadiums around the country have “Kiss Cams” that show a couple on those big screens and encourage them to kiss? We have a suspicion the Kiss Cam has never stopped on a gay couple, male or female. Are these two women victims, or were they trying to make a point?

As opposed to you, who just asks the reader questions and, under no circumstances, ever makes any point, ever. Also: I’ve seen “Kiss Cams” stop on two men, usually wearing a rival team’s gear and sometimes they do kiss (usually it seems like a gag) but I have no idea as to their sexuality.

Would anyone have been offended if they had kissed at the base of the Space Needle?

That is not germane to anything.

To some extent, sports teams have brought this on themselves. Scoreboard messages encourage fans to cheer louder, or boo the opponent as if fans need any extra incentive. TV cameras train on young men with painted chests, young women in shorts and halter tops, and any eccentric they can find. You’ve seen them: the guy making a fool of himself dancing in the aisle, or anyone dressed for Halloween.

I seriously doubt that whether Jose Reyes turns a double play on a short hop ground ball is decided by the shot SNY got of a guy in a clown wig. There is that one time Daryl Strawberry made an error on a fly ball opening up a big inning and caused the Mets to lose a game in 1985 because of my kick-ass Darth Vader Halloween costume.

At least that exhibitionism is generally good-natured. Increasingly, however, some fans are under the impression that purchasing a ticket entitles them to say and do whatever they please. Players aren’t just booed; they’re taunted and verbally abused in a manner that shouldn’t be tolerated. Athletes might earn millions, but that doesn’t mean fans have the right to say things that might subject them to an arrest on the street.

Cry me a river, Sally. God, this is the most boring, worn out “sports” subject ever. It goes:
1. Rose in/out of the Hall of Fame
2. To Boo or not to Boo
3. To Pay/Not Pay College Athletes
4. Instant Replay in Baseball

This is like reading a self-righteous Sporting News Radio transcript. Besides that, the last time I checked, yelling profanity laced or racist taunts gets you escorted out of the stadium. It isn’t tolerated and fans don’t have the right. Your entire point is moot.

We also know too well about players going into the stands during an NBA game in Detroit in 2004 after being provoked, and fans at Giants Stadium tossing ice-encrusted snowballs at players and officials. Some baseball players wear batting helmets in the field as protection from objects being tossed from the stands.

What? Do you watch any baseball? Who wears a batting helmet in the field? First and third base coaches have to wear helmets now so they don’t get hit in the head with foul balls. John Olerud wore a batting helmet in the field but he retired in 2005, and again, to protect against baseballs. Pete would try and have us believe that fans throwing things at players is so rampant that “some players” are wearing them in the field. Either Pete is:

A. Lazy and assumes that his readers are too ignorant to know better.
B. A compulsive liar
C. Ignorant about Major League Baseball
D. A crazy man

Feel free to make stuff up though, Pete.

If Pete wanted to write this story he should have cited the firstbase umpire or the firstbase coach attacked by fans on separate occasions in Chicago or the obsessed Stefi Graf fan who attacked Monica Seles. Those fans were not representative of the average fan, but a better argument than just making something up. If you were going to write a story about unruly fans you shouldn’t have started it off writing about two lesbians kissing.

Wasn’t this article about when a fan is a fan and a kiss is a kiss?

Fans here have not stooped to such levels, but the Monday Morning Quarterback remembers going to a Rangers game with his family a few years ago and eventually requesting that our seats be changed because of an obnoxious, inebriated foursome (two men, two women) behind us.

I was, in fact, a member of that foursome. Ok, I wasn’t, but how great would it have been if I was? I have a theory that they were knowledgeable fans intelligently discussing the Rangers. When Pete overheard them using facts and stats to discuss baseball and not bitching about insignificant, asinine nonsense or bemoaning player salaries, he became offended as Pete, of course, didn’t know what BABIP, OPS, RISP, WHIP or VORP meant so he assumed thought they were drunk and obnoxious. Tell me this wasn’t just and excuse for Pete to bitch about something that offended his fragile sensibilities which coincided with the only time Pete has ever watched a baseball game in his life.

We moved because the attendants were either unwilling or unable to deal with the loud mouths.

This disappoints me. I thought Pete would stand up and smack one of the guys in the face with a batting glove and declare, “Sir, I demand satisfaction!”

NOTE: See what I did there, I made reference to something semi-obscure but not an event that saturated the cable networks for an entire news cycle. I hope said reference resonated with someone, and I’m looking at you, Toasty Joe.

And you wonder why more stadiums have designated areas exclusively for families. Why shouldn’t the entire ballpark be family friendly?

Because I’m for strippers giving lap dances in the seating area, PA announcers swearing during player introductions and hard core porno on the Diamond-vision.

Sports is not the opera, and we’re not advocating that fans sit back in their seats and politely applaud or boo within reason.

Does Pete boo at the opera? That is a very confusing sentence. He is NOT advocating booing within reason? So fans should boo unreasonably or boo without reason? For example, if Michael Young homers, Rangers fans should boo him? I really need to go to the opera with Pete to see how this is accomplished.

But some fans need to be reminded that they are in attendance to watch “The Show,” not to star in it.

Pete starts the piece writing about a story that’s barely interesting for two seconds, and then uses erroneous facts and anecdotal stories to support some kind of non-point in order to end with a condescending preachy condemnation on “sports” fans in general. Pete, you have no respect for your profession, your paper, your colleagues or your readers. Way to go Pete.

You’re an idiot.

Posted under FJM ripoff, Pete Alfano

This post was written by Dan in Texas on June 2, 2008

What a Great Weekend

Fantastic weekend, the Mets have put together a stretch of consistent baseball. It finally feels good to be a Mets fan again.

After the Fox broadcast and listening to Tim McCarver spout nonsense all Saturday afternoon (“Nothing good can happen after a leadoff walk.” I don’t know, how about a double play?) I decided to go and watch the game at the Fox and Hound where they mercifully play music rather than force there customers to endure Joe Morgan and Jon Miller. After the game was over, Takin Care of Business came on, I shit you not.

I’m not really buying the whole sit-down with management and singling out Delgado is the source of the Mets recent turn around. The players are likely coming out of a normal, unusually simultaneous slump, a team wide regression to the mean if you will. The sit down with management and sit down of Delgado did make me feel better.

I won’t say I am upset that Sunday’s game was moved to Sunday night for ESPN. I always felt it’s kind of a special thing to be a national game. If anything, we can appreciate Keith Gary and Ron more.

On that same note, SNY’s coverage has been fantastic lately. Let Keith do all the games behind the plate, I love to hear his analysis of a pitcher from field level.

The Mets are West Coast after only 23 hours after the last game ended. Who better to send to the mound after traversing the country than that emotional rock Oliver Perez and his laser beam like focus. What could possibly go wrong?

Pedro Martinez pitches Tuesday and though I’ve pretty much resigned myself not to expect another inning out of Pedro all year, I’ll be cringing on every pitch and every fielded ball.

Posted under Post Game

This post was written by Dan in Texas on June 2, 2008